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Erin Fonté assists clients with a broad range of matters related to payments/payment systems, digital commerce, banking and financial services (including related legal and regulatory issues), technology/Internet products, privacy and data protection laws, and general corporate matters. Erin regularly advises financial institutions and alternative payment providers regarding mobile banking, mobile payments and mobile wallet products and services. She has been involved in the creation of new payment networks and has worked extensively on products, services and network operating rules related to emerging and mobile payment systems.

Not long ago, financial technology (FinTech) startups were all seeking to disrupt the market for financial services and compete directly with financial institutions (FIs) for customers. But as these startups have grown into more mature companies, cooperation with FIs has come to replace disruption for many FinTech firms. These companies have realized that FIs can help scale their technology to larger bases of potential users, and can also help FinTechs raise capital by showing strong partnerships and FI distribution channels.

In turn, FIs now recognize that FinTech firms offer more than competition, representing potentially valuable partnerships with better technology and an improved user experience. By collaborating with FinTechs, FIs can improve product offerings and increase efficiency, all without the FIs committing significant resources to create new solutions themselves.  Continue Reading Access vs. Security: Takeaways For U.S. Financial Institutions from the European PSD2 Open API Framework

In light of the increasing significance of cybersecurity incidents, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) recently found it necessary to provide further guidance with respect to cybersecurity disclosure requirements under the federal securities laws as they apply to public operating companies. On February 21, 2018, the SEC issued interpretive guidance on the cybersecurity disclosures of public companies through a Commission Statement and Guidance on Public Company Cybersecurity Disclosures (2018 Guidance). In its 2018 Guidance, the SEC emphasized the importance of disclosing material cybersecurity risks, even in cases where a company has not yet suffered a cyberattack. According to the SEC, public companies must stay focused on these issues and take all required action to inform investors about material cybersecurity risks and incidents in a fulsome and timely fashion.

The 2018 Guidance expands the SEC’s 2011 guidance on cybersecurity disclosure obligations and highlights a public company’s disclosure requirements when considering their disclosure obligations surrounding cybersecurity risks and incidents. It also addresses the importance of cybersecurity policies and procedures related to disclosure controls and procedures and reminds companies of their obligation to prohibit insider trading on materially non-public information about threats and incidents. Continue Reading SEC Ratchets Up Cybersecurity Disclosure Requirements